Saturday, September 26, 2015

Why are we here? Why we ARE here. All saints day in the park.

THE NOISECARETAKERSTo God's EarFINAL TENTATIVE
What do you call mentally disabled children now? She was frightened and visibly distressed by the noise of the distant tractor. I watched from my car as the kind, patient, unruffled assistants tried to coax her to join the others who’d found their way to the picnic area. Look at her hand as she tries to reenter the bus. So tentative about the life she inhabits. Someone started to blow bubbles to distract her – to little effect. Finally they coaxed her with the promise of pizza. They took her hand and drifted past my windshield. One of the bubbles persisted for a few moments against a bright blue sky. It finally drifted downward and gave up its form above the freshly mown grass. I tried not to weep.

7 comments:

Rev. Paul said...

Some of us are so fragile, and need so much. I thank God for those called to provide help & care, for those who need it so badly.

Cathy said...

Amen, Rev. Paul. Amen.

Jonna said...

You often say it, and it is so true, that most of us have no right to complain. I am often humbled by those who are able to be patient and open and able to connect with even the most disabled (intellectually disabled, I believe, is the current term).

Cathy said...

Jonna, I posted this on Ricochet. There were many thoughtful responses. This one from a woman who's worked with the intellectually disabled. The statement that " . . . we have no idea what it is like to be them." . . . .

" . . .Really your story of this girl is actually quite a triumph for her. I think it is difficult for us to watch, because we imagine a faster time line, and more immediate response to offered comfort.

Each child has their own set of challenges, and the people who work with them learn to observe closely how the children function in their world, at their own pace.

But mostly we really have no idea what it is like to be them. We can only observe, and do our best to help them cope with their world. It can take much trial and error to categorize the anxieties and fears, and learn to anticipate triggers. On the best day we help them gain some autonomy in their world."

Cathy said...

The comments from those with experience in the field suggested that it was highly likely that she is autistic. It breaks your heart.

Larry said...

From my experience I've found that people with intellectual disabilities have their own unique personalities just like people without disabilities. It's just that the disability is more noticeable than their personalty until you get to know them.

Cathy said...

Larry . .. you seem to speak from experience. I have very, very little. I have so much admiration for those people who help the intellectually disabled make their way through life,